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Research/Projects

Mathematics-Sciences Enhancement with Additive Manufacturing (M-SEAM)

Participants:  Zach Copeland and Drs. Wayne Johnson, Jay Hodgson (Biology), Brandon Quillian (Chemistry), and Jared Schleiper (Math)
Status: In progress

The objective of the project is to establish transformative and integrated teaching, learning and research opportunities across the science, mathematics and engineering disciplines for students and faculty at Armstrong using Additive Manufacturing. Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is a process in which a 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of a part or assembly is used to fabricate a physical version of the part or assembly. The process involves digitally slicing the 3D model into 2D cross-sections and then depositing material over the cross-sections one layer at a time until the part or assembly is built up.  Student learning and engagement in mathematics and science courses can be enhanced with access to physical models of entities of interest, for  example, physical models of complex mathematical surfaces, algae cells, molecules, or compounds.  Specific project goals include: 1) Providing Armstrong students with a tactile approach for interpretation of course concepts; 2) Exposing Armstrong students to state-of-the-art technology; and 3) Fostering greater interdisciplinary teaching and research collaborations in Engineering, Mathematics and the Sciences.

 

Touch Sensitive Glove for Upper Extremity Plyometrics Research

Sponsor:  Biodynamics Center
Participants: Derrick Brown, Joshua Suttle, Manuel O'Canas, Drs. Wayne Johnson, Thomas Murphy, and Bryan Riemann
Status: In progress

Upper extremity plyometric exercises show potential for shoulder injury prevention and rehabilitation.   Plyometrics exercises are physical activities in which muscles are extended and contracted in a rapid and repetitive manner.  An example of a plyometric shoulder exercise consists of repeatedly throwing and catching a medicine ball into a trampoline system as quickly as possible.  However proper characterization of the efficacy of the exercise requires knowledge of ball contact events, specifically, the ball contact and release times.  The objective of this project is to design and test a  low cost touch sensitive glove system that can be used to determine contact events during upper extremity plyometric exercises.


Photo Album


Development of a Eye-Hand Coordination Evaluation System (eH-CES)

Sponsor: Biodynamics Center

Participants: Dialo-Rudolph Brown, Dr. Bryan Riemann, Dr. Wayne Johnson, Bill Deason, and Matthew Rowell

Status: Completed (Sum11-Spr 12)

The objective of this project is to develop a computer-based system to quantify eye-hand coordination. This system is one aspect of Mr. Brown's thesis: '"Comparison of Upper Extremity Sensorimotor Skills Between Martial Artists and Other Athletes" for the Master of Science in Sports Medicine. The thesis will compare "sensorimotor" skills such as eye-hand coordination, sense of muscular effort and positional awareness of the arms ('joint position sense" or "proprioception"), between martial artists and other athletes (such as baseball or tennis players).

Related Presentations:

Riemann, B.L., Russell, B., Phillips, A.., Rudolph-Brown, D., Johnson, W., Davies, G.J. Comparison of upper extremity sensorimotor skills between different groups of athletes.  2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine Accepted for Poster Presentation Orlando, FL, May 30, 2014.

 

Benchmarking Evaluation of an Open Source Fused Deposition Modeling Additive Manufacturing System

Sponsor: AASU Office of Sponsored Programs (Internal Grant), Armstrong/NASA Space Grant Program, Armstrong/NSF-STEP (Science Technology Expansion Program, DUE-0856593)

Participants: Matthew Rowell, Bill Deason, Malik Eubanks and Dr. Wayne Johnson

Status: Completed (Spr10-Sum11)

The availability of more affordable open source Additive Manufacturing (AM) systems has lead to the increased awareness and use of AM technologies. However, further expansion will necessitate improved reliability and an increased understanding in the limitations of these systems. This paper will review previous benchmarking models, and present the development of a new benchmarking model and its application in the evaluation of an open source AM system based on fused deposition modeling (FDM). The proposed benchmarking model includes various geometric features to evaluate the AM system in terms of dimensional accuracy, thermal warpage, staircase effect, and geometric and dimensional tolerances.

Related Papers:

Johnson, W.M., Rowell, M., Deason, B., and Eubanks, M. “Comparative Evaluation of an Open Source FDM System.” Rapid Prototyping Journal. (Accepted for publication Feb 2013. Early cite approx. 25 March 2014 and published in the 22nd April 2014 issue ). 

Johnson, W.M. , Rowell, M., Deason, B., and Eubanks, M. “Benchmarking Evaluation of an open source fused deposition additive manufacturing system.” Proc of the 22nd Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium , Austin, TX, August, 2011.

 

Design of Spray Coating Layer-By-Layer (SCLBL) Deposition Device

Sponsor: Andre' D. Taylor, Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Yale University

Participants: Brian Redden, Justin Brown, Matt Carroll, Jasmine Magerkurth, Ellis Jones, and Dr. Wayne Johnson

Status: Completed (Spr09-Sum09)

Layer by layer (LBL) nanostructure assembly is a process in which a layered structure is built up by exposing a substrate to alternately charged polyelectrolyte (PE) solutions. The technique exploits the electrostatic attraction of oppositely charged molecules to assemble each layer. Currently, the LBL process employs manual or automated exposure of a substrate to PE and rinsing solutions by substrate immersion in multiple beakers. In either case, this process is tedious and often an inefficient use of the PE solutions. This project will design a computer controlled system to automate the application of polyelectrolyte (PE) fluids to a mounted silicon wafer (substrate) using an aerosol spraying technique. The Spray Coating Layer-By-Layer (SCLBL) deposition device will deploy two types of PE fluids, an aqueous wash, and a forced air drying system on the substrate. The computer control interface will allow for specification of the sequence and duration of PE solution exposure on the substrate.

 Related Papers:

Gittleson, F. S., D. J. Kohn, X. Li, and A. Taylor. “Improving the Assembly Speed, Quality, and Tunability of Thin Conductive Multilayers.” ACS Nano 6, no. 5 (2012): 3703–3711.


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Introducing Web-Based Virtual Laboratories in Introduction to Engineering Materials

Sponsor: AASU Office of Sponsored Programs (Internal Grant)

Participants: Dr. Priya T. Goeser (Principal Investigator), Dr. Wayne Johnson and Dr. Felix Hamza-Lup

Status: Phase I Completed (Spr08-Fall08) . Phase II: Ongoing

Abstract:

Current research on the effectiveness of virtual laboratories shows positive results: reinforcement of concepts from lecture material, exposure to practical issues associated with experiments and illustration of applications of theoretical concepts. Virtual laboratories can be used as a supplement in certain courses with an objective to improve students' understanding of fundamental concepts. The main objective of this project is to implement virtual laboratories to supplement the course: Introduction to Engineering Materials (ENGR2000). Hands on laboratories are an essential part of engineering and science education wherein students are introduced to data analysis, report writing, finding empirical correlations between experimental variables and data and to validate theories. The development of the tools for this project will provide advanced learning and research opportunities for engineering and computer science students in the areas of three-dimensional Computer Aided Design (3-D CAD) model development and web programming, both of which are essential, state of the art tools in the respective disciplines.

Project Website

Related Papers:

Goeser, P. T., Johnson, W. M., Bernadin, S. L., Gajdosik-Nivens, D. A., “Work-in-Progress: The Impact of MatLab Marina - A Virtual Learning Environment on Student Learning in a Computing for Engineers Course” Proceedings of the 120th Annual ASEE Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, GA.  June 23-26, 2013.

Goeser, P.T., Johnson, W.M., Hamza-Lup, F.G. and Shaefer, D. “VIEW– A Virtual, Interactive Web-based Learning Environment for Engineering”. Advances in Engineering Education, A Journal of Engineering Education Applications, Special Issue on Research on e-Learning in Engineering Education, Winter, 2011

Goeser, P.T., Johnson, W.M. , Hamza-Lup, F.G. and Shaefer, D. “VIEW– A Virtual, Interactive Web-based Learning Environment for Engineering” . submitted to Advances in Engineering Education, A Journal of Engineering Education Applications, Special Issue on Research on e-Learning in Engineering Education, Winter, 2011.

Goeser, P. T., Johnson, W ., Hamza-Lup, F. “A VIEW on Mechanical Dissection for Freshman Engineering” abstract submitted to presented at the 2010 ASEE Southeastern Section Annual Conference, Blacksburg, VA. April 18–20, 2010.

Goeser, P. T., Johnson, W ., Hamza-Lup, F., Sopin, I. , Sanchez, C. and Hager, P. “A Different View: Virtual Interactive Engineering on the Web” presented at the 2009 Annual ASEE Conference & Exposition. Austin , TX . June 2009.

 

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Construction and Testing of a Desktop Rapid Prototyping System

Sponsor: Minority Access to Graduate Education and Careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

MAGEC-STEM, Savannah State University/NSF

Participants: Ken Warchalowsky

Past Participants: William Cantrell, Larretta Clark, Nyrell Stevens, and Dr. Wayne M. Johnson

Status: Completed (SPR/SU 07-SU09)

Abstract:

Rapid prototyping (RP) is a relatively new technology that allows physical (prototype) models to be created from a three-dimensional computer aided design (CAD) drawing. Use of these physical models is a significant tool in product design and realization. The parts are created by depositing material layer-by-layer in cross-sectional planes until the part is "built-up". The cost of commercial RP devices is the most prohibitive aspect in the adaptation of this technology by inventors and smaller sized companies. This project intends to construct a low-cost rapid prototyping system based on the open-source Fab@Home Personal Desktop Fabricator Kit developed by Cornell University. The device incorporates a microcontroller positioning system driven by stepper motors and a material deposition system, all enclosed in an acrylic housing structure. The control system interfaces with a PC via USB and a software program to interpret the 3D CAD file. The 3D CAD files will be created using SolidWorks modeling software. The completed device will be used to create RP models to support teaching and learning spatial visualization skills in the Engineering Graphics course (ENGR 1170) at Armstrong Atlantic State University. This project will expose its participants to cutting-edge RP technology and provide hands-on experience in the area of mechatronics-the synthesis of electrical and mechanical components with a control system.

FAB@AASU Website

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AMRTC Application Projects

Sponsor: Dr. Alesia Ferguson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS)

Participants: Dr. Alesia Ferguson, Dr. Zoran Bursac, S. Coleman, D. Biddle, and Dr. Wayne Johnson

The apparatus for measurement of residue transfer coefficient (AMRTC) has been used to generate data for several research studies headed by Dr. Alesia Ferguson at UAMS. The projects have included studies of soil to skin adherence from carpeted and aluminum surfaces under single and multiple contact scenarios. We have also examined the modification of the chamber to study nanoparticle skin adherence.

Related Papers:

Ferguson, A. C., Bursac, Z., & Johnson, W. “Combined Analysis of Results on Single and Multiple Contacts: Potting Soil, Sand and Clay Transfers to Cloth for the Estimate of Soil Adherence to Human Skin.”  Environment and Natural Resources Research, 3(3):33-44, 2013.

Ferguson, A., Bursac, Z., Johnson, W. and Davis, J. Computer-Controlled Chamber Measurement for Clay Adherence Relevant for Potential Dioxin Exposure through Skin. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A 47 (3):382-388, 2012.

  Ferguson, A., Davis, J.,  Bursac, Z., and Johnson, W. and Davis, J. “Computer Controlled Chamber Measurements for Dermal Adherence: Clay, Soil and Sand.” ASTM Symposium on Surface and Dermal Sampling, San Antonio, TX. October 12-14, 2010.

Ferguson , A. Bursac, Z., Coleman, S., Biddle, D., Johnson, W., "Soil-Skin Adherence from Carpet: Use of a Mechanical Chamber to Control Contact Parameters", Journal of Environmental Science and Health, A43 (12), 2008.

Ferguson , A. , Coleman, S., Biddle, D., Bursac, Z., Johnson, W., "Comparison of In-Vitro Soil Adherence For Multiple Contacts Using a Controlled Mechanical Chamber" Accepted for publication in Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, May, 2008.

Ferguson , A. , Coleman, S., Biddle, D., Bursac, Z., Johnson, W., "In-Vitro Soil Adherence for Dermal Exposure Using a Controlled Mechanical Chamber" Risk Analysis", Re-Submitted June, 2007.

Ferguson , A. , Bursac, Z., Coleman, S., Biddle, D., Johnson, W., "Comparisons of Computer Controlled Chamber Measurements for Soil-Skin Adherence from Aluminum and Carpet Surfaces", Environmental Health, Submitted April 2008.

Grants:

Carbon Nanotube Adherence to and Interaction with Human Skin. PI: A. Ferguson, Co-PI: A. Biris, Senior Personnel: Z. Bursac, W. Johnson. Funds requested: $355, 616. Funding Agency: Environmental Protection Agency, Human Exposure and Bioavailability: EPA-G2007-STAR-R2. Status: Not funded.

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Enhancement of Engineering Graphics with Rapid Prototyping

 

Sponsor: AASU Office of Sponsored Programs (Internal Grant)

Participants: Dr. Wayne Johnson (Principal Investigator) and Dr. Cameron Coates

Status: (Fall 2006/Spr 2007)

Abstract:

The goals of this project are to improve students' spatial visualization abilities and to provide student and faculty exposure to the current state of the art in product realization using rapid prototyping in the Engineering Graphics course (ENGR 1170) of the Engineering Studies Program at Armstrong Atlantic State University . Rapid prototyping is a relatively new technology that allows physical (prototype) models to be created from a three-dimensional computer aided design (CAD) drawing. Use of these physical models in conjunction with traditional planar representations of parts should improve students' ability to visualize and draw the surfaces and features of these objects. Further, this project will provide students with opportunities to create drawings by taking direct measurements of a physical part, and illustrate how new technologies such as rapid prototyping are improving the design and manufacturing of products and devices.

 

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Sponsor: Dr. Alesia Ferguson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Investigator: Dr. Wayne M. Johnson

Students: Patrick Hager, Aristide Sanou and Daniel Shenoda

Status: Completed SPR 2006

AMRTC web site

Surface residue transfer coefficients are used to quantify dermal exposure to chemicals (e.g., pesticides) as a percentage of the chemical residue transferred from a surface to the human skin during a dermal contact event. This project entails the design and construction of an apparatus for the measurement of residue transfer coefficient (RTC). The apparatus must effectively facilitate contact between cadaver or pseudo skin (representative of human skin), and common residential surfaces as a function of contact pressure, contact time, co-present solvents, temperature and relative humidity. The device uses a pneumatic system to apply pressures to skin samples; air conditioning and humidification systems; various instrumentation devices and sensors, and a PC based data acquisition system to achieve the desired parameters.

Applying Computational Modeling Techniques to Statics Problems: An Attempt at Intradisciplinary Teaching in the Engineering Studies Curriculum.

Participants: Dr. Wayne M. Johnson and Dr. Priya Thamburaj

Status: Completed Fall 2005-Fall 2006

Abstract:

Students often struggle with applying course concepts from one class to related courses. This work attempts to address this issue by using specific problem examples from the Introduction to Mechanics course (ENGR 2201) adapted for use in the Computational Modeling course (ENGR 2010). The results of student evaluations and the presenters’ experiences on the intradisciplinary teaching effort will be discussed.

Publication:

Johnson, W. M. and Thamburaj, P. "Applying Computational Modeling Techniques to Statics Problems: An Attempt at Intradisciplinary Teaching in the Engineering Studies Curriculum.," AASU 6th  Annual Symposium on Teaching & Learning, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah, GA. 31 March 2006.

Propagation of Damage in Functionally Graded Materials under Impact Loads

Sponsor: AASU Office of Sponsored Programs (Internal Grant)

Participants: Dr. Priya Thamburaj (Principal Investigator) and Dr. Wayne Johnson

Status: Completed SPR 2006 (Summer/Fall 2005, Spring 2006)

The primary objective of this work is to study the propagation of damage in functionally graded materials (materials with non-homogeneous physical properties) subject to impact loads. The emphasis of the study will be on the relationship between the propagation of damage and the grading of properties such as elastic modulus, intact strength and damage parameters. A finite element model using the dynamic finite element software, LS-DYNA with an implementation of the Johnson-Holmquist damage theory, will be developed for such a material. The different cases of property grading will be incorporated in the above model. The material will then be subjected to impact loads followed by a detailed finite element analysis. The propagation of damage within the material as a function of position and time will be studied. A numerical analysis software MATLAB will be used to explore the relationship between the damage propagation and the property grading. This study can be used for the design of functionally graded materials, which allow optimum damage propagation.

Publication:

Thamburaj, P. and Johnson, W.   "Propagation of Damage in Functionally Graded Materials under Impact Loads". 47th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/ AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, Newport, Rhode Island. 2 May 2006.

Integration of Robotics Based Problem Solving in the Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum

 

Sponsor: Minority Access to Graduate Education and Careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

MAGEC-STEM, Savannah State University/NSF

Participants: Tanisha Gordon, Andrew Stephenson and Dr. Wayne M. Johnson

Status: Completed (SPR/SU 2006)

Abstract:

The objective of this work is to develop several laboratory modules using Lego Mindstorms for use in AASU's Introduction to Engineering course (ENGR 1100). This project will involve learning how to build and program robots using Lego Mindstorms. It will also require the development of 3-5 laboratory exercises for ENGR 1100 students. This work will afford its participants an opportunity to develop algorithm formulation and technical writing skills, and construct robotic devices.

Presentation:

Andrew Stephenson. "Integration of Robotics Based Problem Solving in the Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum". Received 1st Place in Poster Competition at the Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (PSLSAMP) Fall Forum and Research Conference held October 19-21, 2006 in Marietta, GA. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Wayne Johnson .

Modeling and Structural Analysis of the ER1 Personal Robot

Sponsor: Minority Access to Graduate Education and Careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

MAGEC-STEM, Savannah State University/NSF

Student: Branden Hunter, Savannah State University

Status: Completed (Spring/Fall 2005)

Abstract:

This project involves the development of a three dimensional solid model and finite element analysis of the ER1 Personal Robot using SolidWorks. The modeling will entail disassembly of the ER1 robot into its constituent parts and creating a solid model of each part. These parts will then be used to create an assembly model of the reassembled robot. Finally, a simplified structural analysis will be preformed on the support frame of the robot using the COSMOSXpress finite element analysis package.

Publication:

Hunter, B. and Johnson, W. M. “Modeling and Structural Analysis of the ER1 Personal Robot”. 7th Annual HBCU- Undergraduate Program National Research Conference. Baltimore, MD. 10 February 2006.

Use of Principle Velocity Patterns in the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Optimization

Participant: Kenneth A. Cunefare, The George W.Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology

Status: Paper accepted in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. Feb 2007.

This work presents an application of principle velocity patterns in the analysis of the structural acoustic design optimization of an eight ply composite cylindrical shell. The approach consists of performing structural acoustic optimizations of a composite cylindrical shell subject to external harmonic monopole excitation. The ply angles are used as the design variables in the optimization. The results of the ply angle design variable formulation are interpreted using the singular value decomposition of the interior acoustic potential energy. The decomposition of the acoustic potential energy provides surface velocity patterns associated with lower levels of interior noise. These surface velocity patterns are shown to correspond to those from the structural acoustic optimization results. Thus, it is demonstrated that the capacity to design multi-ply composite cylinders for quiet interiors is determined by how well the cylinder be can designed to exhibit particular surface velocity patterns associated with lower noise levels.

•  Johnson, W. M. and Cunefare, K. A. "Use of Principle Velocity Patterns in the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Optimization". Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (Accepted for publication: February 2007).

 

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Dr. Wayne Johnson
School of Computing
Armstrong Atlantic State University
11935 Abercorn Street
Savannah, Georgia 31419-1997

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wayne.johnson(at)armstrong.edu

Last Updated:16-Oct-2011 17:57


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